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  • HON 201: Reform in Criminal Law, Police & Justice

    HON 201 Reform in Criminal Law, Police & Justice – 1 hour
    27560    Mondays, 4:00 – 4:50 PM     L. Robles

    The course explores incidents that warrant a change to specific areas of the current criminal justice system. The course will concentrate on specific events in recent history that have lead to the introduction of new policies. The topics are not an exhaustive list of the reasons that policy makers have demanded changes to criminal justice however; they are the events that have been the focus of attention in the media. We will first survey a general introduction to criminal law and the changing role of police in society. The first issue of discussion will concentrate on the increase in “Active Shooter” occurrences across the country such as Sandy Hook, Virginia Tech and U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. The class will then transition to the second amendment and tackle the issues behind gun purchase restrictions vs. the second amendment right to bear arms. In addition, the class will assess the use of deadly force by police and apply the law to the facts in the Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin cases. Students will then visit the Insanity Defense and apply the recent murder of American Sniper Chris Kyle. Finally, students will study the Boston Marathon Bombing trial.

    Interested? Register online. Want to see more options? View the full list of Honors courses for Fall 2015! Remember that taking an Honors course can fulfill your Honors Activity requirement. Or if you already have an idea about what to do for your Honors activity, consider taking these exciting courses for your personal growth and enrichment! 

  • Kinesiology Intercollege Transfer Information Sessions

  • Info Session for HC/Roosevelt Exchange Collaboration (5/13)

  • POLS 101 now offered in 4-week summer session

    POLS 101: Introduction to American Government and Politics has been added for the 4 week summer session.

    POLS 101  CRN  18785/18786  9:00-11:55 MTRF  Grand Hall 204, May 18-June 12.

    POLS 101 Introduction to American Government and Politics
    3 hours. Introduction to American political ideas, individual and group political behavior, institutions of national government, and public policy. May be taught in blended learning format. Please check the online schedule of classes for blended sections. Individual and Society, and US Society course.

    There will be no textbook. All the readings will be pdfs on the Blackboard site.

    If you have questions about the course, contact Professor Evan McKenzie at mckenzie@uic.edu.  If you have questions about whether taking this course is a good fit for your educational goals, contact your academic advisor.

  • Juntos: Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Latinx Students, and the Future of Study Abroad Panel (10/2)

  • Informational Session on the Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar – Wed. 10/25 at 3pm

  • HON 201: Maximizing Individual and Organizational Effectiveness: The Human Side of Business

    Would you like to gain insight from an industry expert on human capital? This seminar discusses how an organization can maximize its employees—both individual contributors and formal leaders—to create value, including topics such as relationship building, leading diverse teams, human aspects of acquisitions, and geographic expansion and restructuring, among others.

    The class meets Wednesdays from 8:00 - 8:50 am and is taught by Professor Oliver.  The class is one credit hour, graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.  View more details here: http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf

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    To view a full list of Honors Seminar offerings for Spring 2015, visit http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf.  We encourage Honors students to take Honors Seminars to fulfill your Honors Activity for Spring 2015 (for sophomores, juniors, and seniors not working on Capstones) or just to explore areas of interest and learn about new topics. 

  • More Seats Available for Online PSCH 100 and HIST 105 in 8-Week Summer Session

  • HON 201: An Introduction to Faculty Research on Diversity

    HON 201        An Introduction to Faculty Research on Diversity – 1 hour

    13770                    10:00 – 10:50      W                                            L. Baptista

    NOTE: This course will be held in 200 AH (The AACC Library)

    The Honors College embraces the university mission of supporting an understanding of diversity. As such, the College offers “An Introduction to Faculty Research on Diversity.” This seminar introduces students to the range of research conducted by UIC faculty members on topics related to race, ethnicity, prejudice, discrimination, diversity, social identity, cultural understanding and diaspora, etc. Faculty from colleges and disciplines across campus engage students in accessible and informative presentations that explore both the subject and methodology of their research.

    Interested? Register online. Want to see more options? View the full list of Honors courses for Fall 2015! Remember that taking an Honors course can fulfill your Honors Activity requirement. Or if you already have an idea about what to do for your Honors activity, consider taking these exciting courses for your personal growth and enrichment! 

  • HON 201: Race and Ethnicity on the American Stage

    How are issues of race and ethnicity represented on select theater performances from the Civil War era to the present? This seminar views theater as public form to examine how it addresses conflicts and cultural division and inspire responses.

    The class meets Tuesdays from 9:30 - 10:45 am and is taught by Professor McDermott.  The class is one credit hour, graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.  View more details here: http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf

    ---

    To view a full list of Honors Seminar offerings for Spring 2015, visit http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf.  We encourage Honors students to take Honors Seminars to fulfill your Honors Activity for Spring 2015 (for sophomores, juniors, and seniors not working on Capstones) or just to explore areas of interest and learn about new topics. 

  • New Art Education Undergraduate Major – Application Deadline: Jan 12, 2018

  • The War that Made Today: HON 201 Seminars this Fall Examine the Lasting Global Impact of World War

  • Beach cleanup: An intro to UIC Freshwater Lab, Wed. 9/16

    A beach cleanup Sept. 16 will not only improve a bit of the Chicago lakefront but serve as an introduction to the new UIC Freshwater Lab course.

    Starting next spring, the course will offer students the opportunity to learn about and do projects on freshwater sources like Lake Michigan.

    For the beach cleanup, volunteers can bike together from Science and Engineering South to 12th Street Beach, leaving at 2:45 p.m., or meet at the beach, near the Red Line and Roosevelt bus stops, at 3:30 p.m.

    A pizza party with live music, sponsored by the Shedd Aquarium, will follow at 4:45 p.m. RSVP by today at uicfreshwaterlab@gmail.com

    The volunteers will hear about the Freshwater Lab course, offered through the English, history and public policy departments.

    It is sponsored by the Humanities Without Walls consortium, based at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities on the Urbana-Champaign campus and funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

    “At this time of the California drought and other pressing water issues, we want to look at the relationship between Chicago and the Great Lakes and issues of access, conservation and management,” said Rachel Havrelock, assistant professor of English, who will teach the course.

    Class members will visit the aquarium, foundations, the Friends of the Chicago River and other water-related institutions.

    “We’ll go out and see the sites and meet the players,” Havrelock said.

    Students will come up with a project — “build a website, do an art show, invent a filtration system” — to present at a mini-conference at the end of the semester, she said.

    Their work will be judged by professionals, government officials and academics.

  • HON 201: Climate Change: Acceptance and Denial

    What risks does human-induced climate change bring to civilization and how people talk and conceive such risks? This seminar explores the realities and uncertainties of climate science by reading Mann’s book, and discusses plausible scientific, media, business and political critiques of climate-change research and its implications.

    The class meets Thursdays from 11 - 11:50am and is taught by Professor Howe.  The class is one credit hour, graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.  View more details here: http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf

    ---

    To view a full list of Honors Seminar offerings for Spring 2015, visit http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf.  We encourage Honors students to take Honors Seminars to fulfill your Honors Activity for Spring 2015 (For sophomores, juniors, and seniors not working on Capstones) or just to explore areas of interest and learn about new topics. 

  • HON 201: The Anthropocene and the Sixth Extinction: Human Impact on Earth’s Natural Systems

    With the dramatic increase of extinction rates among diverse groups of organisms, it has been suggested that we are now in a new part of the geological time scale, informally designated the Anthropocene. This seminar examines the arguments on Anthropocene with a particular focus on the Sixth Extinction, including a review of and comparison with of the “Big Five” extinctions of the fossil record. The class also examines the ethics and technology of “de-extinction” and efforts to protect endangered species.

    The class meets Wednesdays from 2:00 - 2:50 pm and is taught by Professor Plotnick.  The class is one credit hour, graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.  View more details here: http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf

    ---

    To view a full list of Honors Seminar offerings for Spring 2015, visit http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf.  We encourage Honors students to take Honors Seminars to fulfill your Honors Activity for Spring 2015 (for sophomores, juniors, and seniors not working on Capstones) or just to explore areas of interest and learn about new topics. 

  • New Spring 2018 Anthropology Courses: "Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Development" & "Fossil Humans"

  • New "Portuguese for Romance Language Speakers" Class Offered this Fall

  • New Summer 2020 Education course--CI 494 "Curriculum of Life and COVID-19: Disparities, Resilience, and Educational Renewal"

  • Limited space available in HON 294: Leadership: A Skill to be Learned and Earned!

    HON 294: "Leadership: A Skill to be Learned and Earned" 

    --TR, 9:30-10:45 (3 hrs; CRN: 35117)

    **Leadership is one key to your success in life, and developing your leadership qualities constitutes an ever-important task, regardless of what career you choose.

    **You will meet local leaders from diverse industries to learn from their insight and experience. 

    **You will learn to integrate theories with practice from Prof. Bill Kohler, a great professor from Managerial Studies!

  • Field Course in Computational Ecology (including fieldwork in Kenya), Info Session Mon. 10/20

    Announcing Field Computational Ecology course.
    Information meeting Monday, October 20, 6pm in 1127 SEO

    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    Field Course in Computational Population Biology
    Spring 2015 (with preparation starting in November 2014)


    Instructors:
    Tanya Berger-Wolf (UIC),
    Daniel Rubenstein (Princeton),
    Iain Couzin (Max Planck Institute)

    A unique highly integrated field course is offered partially in Kenya (at the Mpala Research Centre) where biology and engineering students will work with faculty in both disciplines to learn how to ask questions, frame hypotheses and understand how and why the disciplines and cultures do this differently. The course will begin with background preparation in November-December where students learn the key concepts and approaches from biology, computer science and engineering. The initial interdisciplinary orientation will be followed by a research project in the field. The on-location course January 5-23 will be followed up throughout the semester culminating in a conference of student presentations.

    Fall lectures will cover a range of topics in computer science and ecology:
    *Introduction to population biology and ecology
    *Behavioral ecology and social interactions
    *Computational thinking
    *Data science
    *Network analysis

    The 2012 course is available at
    http://compbio.cs.uic.edu/~tanya/teaching/KenyaCourse.html

    The course is appropriate for upper level undergraduate students.
    --
    Dr. Tanya Berger-Wolf
    Department of Computer Science
    University of Illinois at Chicago
    compbio.cs.uic.edu/~tanya
    tanyabw@uic.edu 

  • HON 201: Literary Hell: Comparative Narratives of Descent

    HON 201 Literary Hell: Comparative Narratives of Descent - 1 credit hour
    CRN: 13760,  3:00 – 3:50 Wednesdays, Taught by R. Ryder

    Representations of the underworld can be found throughout both Eastern and Western literary traditions, and not all of them conform to the typical notion of a place of torment and damnation, fire and brimstone. This course will focus on “underworld literature,” those texts that do not necessarily depict Hell – although some certainly do – but which are nevertheless deeply concerned with what lies under the surface of the Earth. Beginning with Plato’s cave, we will continue with different textual representations of the underworld, from the Orpheus myth and Dante’s Inferno to the texts of Milton, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Jules Verne, Dostoevsky, H. G. Wells and Sartre, among others. We will also consider the depiction of Hell and the underworld in films such as Scorsese’s Apocalypse Now and comics like Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman series. We will consider not only the ways in which the underworld is determined by the political, historical, and spiritual circumstances of this world, but also what promises and punishments the underworld has to offer beyond the world in which we live.

    Interested? Register online. Want to see more options? View the full list of Honors courses for Fall 2015! Remember that taking an Honors course can fulfill your Honors Activity requirement. Or if you already have an idea about what to do for your Honors activity, consider taking these exciting courses for your personal growth and enrichment! 

  • POLS European Courses

  • LAS Intercollege Transfer Process

  • HON 201: The Politics of Public Space

    Are all public spaces inclusive—that is, are they equally accessible to people of different race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, and ability? This course challenges students’ understanding of their environment by using the UIC Library as a site of analysis. This course will run in tandem with a course at Northwestern University as part of the new Chicago Local Online Collaborative Course project, an iteration of a Distributed Online Collaborative Course (DOCC) which is a feminist response to the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) model. In addition to communicating via online methods, students from both universities will come together at UIC at the end of the term to discuss their findings at each institution’s library. For more information on MOOCs and DOCCs, visit: http://femtechnet.newschool.edu/docc2013/ 

    The class meets Wednesdays from 10 - 10:50am and is taught by Professor Moreno.  The class is one credit hour, graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.  View more details here: http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf

    ---

    All Honors students are encouraged to take Honors Seminars to explore areas of interest and learn about new topics. To view a full list of Honors Seminar offerings for Spring 2015, visit http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf.

  • HON 201: Water: The Matrix of Life

    The properties of water, its fundamental structure, its behavior as a solvent, its importance in biological systems and some interesting physics. We will also examine societal concerns related to water and its chemistry.

    The class meets Thursdays from 2:00 - 3:00 pm and is taught by Professor Woodbury.  The class is one credit hour, graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.  View more details here: http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf

    ---

    To view a full list of Honors Seminar offerings for Spring 2015, visit http://www.uic.edu/honors/learning/documents/20151-CourseListWEB.pdf.  We encourage Honors students to take Honors Seminars to fulfill your Honors Activity for Spring 2015 (for sophomores, juniors, and seniors not working on Capstones) or just to explore areas of interest and learn about new topics. 

  • Global Asian Studies Seminar with Internship Opportunity

  • Fall 2020 EPSY 242 "Introduction to Sexuality Development Across the Lifespan" seats available--gen ed credit!

  • Public Health Course for Fall – Pre-Health Students Take Note

  • The images include the logo from the FACE Foundation which funded my grant to teach the program and the program includes a group of students who visited Paris on the Study Abroad internships when live exchange was possible to inspire current students to travel virtually.

    Summer Course Opportunity: Psychology 394 (Transitioning to a Virtual Exchange) with Dr. Kathryn Engel

  • There are photographs of birds, plants, and flowers on the top, right side of the flyer. The logo for the American Society for Microbiology is also included in red.

    New Summer Course: BIOS 431 with Dr. Katherine Warpeha!

  • Pink background with a grid. There is a graphic of a garbage truck.

    New Summer Course Available: ENGL120 - Cinema and Culture

  • Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute – Application Deadline: April 1

  • Fall Art Classes Open to Non-Art Majors

  • Community-Engaged Leadership Certificate - Applications due 9/15

    The Staley School of Leadership Studies at Kansas State University, in partnership with Points of Light and AT&T are pleased to announce the launch of a new undergraduate certificate program, offered via distance education. The Certificate in Community-Engaged Leadership program will launch in January 2017. Thanks to the generous support of the AT&T Foundation, partial and full scholarships are now available.

    General Program Information

    Kansas State University, in partnership with Points of Light, has developed a certificate program in Community-Engaged Leadership. This program is first of its kind, offering a network of resources, consisting of academic expertise from a top land-grant university, Points of Light’s national network, and local support through community advisors. The certificate program is designed to develop community-engaged leaders, who will work to mobilize community members and local organizations, within their own communities, to make progress on complex challenges. This program was designed intentionally to keep you in the community you care about so as a student you can work to mobilize community members around environmental, social, political, and economic issues in your neighborhood.

    Theme

    The work of the 2017 inaugural cohort will be themed around education's role in strengthening democracy and developing engaged citizens. Although each participant will bring diverse interests and experiences, the theme will provide an opportunity for participants to evaluate, strategize, and make progress within the context of education. By working within this common theme, participants will contribute to the collective learning of the group while pursuing solutions to their unique challenges and focusing on their personal leadership development. For instance, while one participant in the certificate program could be engaged in environmental issues and another in food justice, both will explore and implement innovative ideas within broader theme of education.

    Click on the post for more information.

  • Seats still open in HON 142 Theatre: Play with a Purpose!

  • Fall 2022 Honors Course - HON 200 - Working Toward Authenticity

  • Check out these Spring 2020 Portuguese courses!

  • McGowan Institute – Regenerative Medicine Summer School 2017, Applications due 4/1

  • HON 201: Introduction to Research and Critical Thinking

    HON 201 Introduction to Research and Critical Thinking – 2 hours

    CRN: 21199,  12:00 - 12:50pm Mondays, Taught by Professor McKirnan
    (Note This course will be a 2-credit hour blended module package with one Honors seminar and one online course.)

    This course introduces research and critical thinking to Honors College students from any major, to prepare them for entering into research with faculty across campus. It covers the basics of research—how to conceive a research question, what are various types of research and their underlying principles, and so on; and also practical matters such as IRB issues, how to find a faculty member to work with, and where to look for undergraduate research funding, among others.

    Interested? Register online. Want to see more options? View the full list of Honors courses for Fall 2015! Remember that taking an Honors course can fulfill your Honors Activity requirement. Or if you already have an idea about what to do for your Honors activity, consider taking these exciting courses for your personal growth and enrichment! 

  • Summer Law Program for Undergraduates at Florida State University, Apply by 3/28

    Thinking about law school?  The Florida State University College of Law is currently accepting applications for its 2014 Summer for Undergraduates Program, which provides students an inside look at law school and the legal profession.  The program will take place May 19-June 12. All undergraduate students, except those graduating in spring 2014, are eligible to apply. 

    Approximately 60 students will be chosen from the applicant pool to participate in the intensive four-week program. Daily lecture classes taught by a Florida State Law professor will familiarize students with the functions of the American legal system and the process by which conflicts are resolved. Legal Writing classes will help students develop their verbal and written communication skills. In addition to the rigorous academic focus of the program, participants also will be exposed to LSAT overview workshops and a simulated exam, law school admissions sessions, visits to local state and federal courts and law offices, and guest lectures by prominent attorneys in a variety of practice areas.

    The College of Law provides free room and board, course materials, and a travel stipend to all participants. There is no program tuition, but participants are responsible for their travel expenses to and from Tallahassee.  

    To apply, students must complete the online application and submit a resume, one letter of recommendation, a personal statement, and a current transcript. Applications must be submitted by Friday, March 28, 2014. For more information or to view our program video, visit www.law.fsu.edu/slp.  Questions?  Contact summerprogram@law.fsu.edu

  • Register for the Spring 2021 Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar!

  • Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar: Exchange Before Orientalism: Asia and Europe 1500-1800, Info Session, Mon. 10/24

    Dear UIC Students,

    I am delighted to announce the topic for the Spring 2017 Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar:  Exchange before Orientalism: Asia and Europe 1500-1800.  The Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar is a team-taught interdisciplinary course that is open to undergraduates from four Chicago-area universities (DePaul, Loyola, UIC, and Roosevelt).  The six-credit course provides undergraduate students an unparalleled opportunity to conduct archival research in one of the country's foremost public research libraries. This year the seminar will explore the multiple exchanges—commercial, political, religious—between Asia and Europe during this fascinating period before European imperialism transformed an uncertain process of mutual familiarization into a struggle for dominance.

    The seminar will meet at the Newberry Library, 60 West Walton Street, on Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00-5:00 (January 17-May 4) and will be taught by Professor Laura Hostetler (History, UIC) and Professor Ellen McClure (French/History, UIC).

    Each student who is accepted into the seminar will be awarded a $250 scholarship to cover the cost of transportation and other research related expenses.  Any junior or senior at UIC is eligible to apply.  This potentially could serve as a Capstone project for Honors College students.

    An Info Session will be held on Monday, October 24 from 2 - 3pm in 114 Burnham Hall.

    To apply for the course, simply complete an application form and submit it electronically with the required materials to: Professor Lisa A. Freeman, lfreeman@uic.edu.   The application deadline is Monday, October 31.

    If you have questions about the course, please do not hesitate to contact me. I am eager to ensure a strong contingent of students from UIC and would be more than happy to meet with you to discuss the course.

     

    Yours,

    Lisa A. Freeman

    Professor

    Department of English

  • HON 201: Biomedical Discovery and the Media

    HON 201 Biomedical Discovery and the Media – 1 hour
    CRN: 13684,  1:00 – 1:50 pm on Fridays, Professor R. Debreuil

    We live in an era in which scientific discovery is happening at breakneck speed. Every day there are news stories that update and extend the material in our textbooks. For the layperson, there is a daunting assortment of new information to absorb. In this course, students will learn about connections between science and society by looking at how new discoveries in biomedical science are communicated to the general public. We will analyze current news stories as a reflection of what scientific advances have the greatest impact on society. At the same time we will have the opportunity to explore routes used to communicate scientific information to the public. In addition, there has been a fundamental change in the way that we access information. We will debate whether the change has made things better or worse, from the point of view of scientists. We will ask: How is scientific communication evolving, and what are the challenges for the future?

    Interested? Register online. Want to see more options? View the full list of Honors courses for Fall 2015! Remember that taking an Honors course can fulfill your Honors Activity requirement. Or if you already have an idea about what to do for your Honors activity, consider taking these exciting courses for your personal growth and enrichment! 

  • Global Health Course Offering in St. Kitts and Nevis in Summer 2020 (info session on 12/9)

  • Drive-Up WiFi Map

  • Register Now! - New Courses in Instructional Design and Training Starting Fall 2022

  • Honors Activity Option: Discussing Current Events + Hard Topics

  • Purple background with a profile photograph of the instructor. The UIC Honors College logo is on the bottom left.

    Seats still open in HON 142 Theatre: Play with a Purpose!

  • Change the world through policy! Public Policy Minor

  • Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar on Resistance to Slavery, Deadline 11/2

    Dear UIC students,

    I am delighted to announce the topic for the Spring 2016 Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar:  Break the Chains:  Revolt, Rebellion, and Resistance in the World of Atlantic Slavery.  The Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar is a team-taught interdisciplinary course that is open to undergraduates from four Chicago-area universities (DePaul, Loyola, UIC, and Roosevelt).  The six-credit course provides undergraduate students an unparalleled opportunity to conduct archival research in one of the country's foremost public research libraries. This year the seminar will explore the many varieties of slave resistance in the Atlantic world, using primary documents from Europe, Africa, and especially the Caribbean. Topics will include revolt among maritime laborers; the creation of multicultural communities among enslaved Africans and Indigenous people; Caribbean slave revolts; the relationship between slave resistance and the abolitionist movement; slave conspiracies in the decades before the U. S. Civil War; and the influence of slave rebellions on the philosophy, music, and literature of the period.

    The course will meet at the Newberry Library, 60 West Walton Street, on Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00-5:00 (January 12-May 5) and will be taught by Professor John Donoghue, associate professor of history at Loyola University, and Professor Jeffrey Glover, associate professor of English at Loyola.

    Each student who is accepted into the seminar will be awarded a $250 scholarship to cover the cost of transportation and other research related expenses.  Any junior or senior at UIC is eligible to apply.

    To apply for the course, simply fill-out an application form and submit it electronically with the required materials to:  Professor Lisa A. Freeman, lfreeman@uic.edu.   The application deadline is Monday, November 2.

    If you have questions about the course, please do not hesitate to contact me. I am eager to ensure a strong contingent of students from UIC and would be more than happy to meet with you to discuss the course.

    Yours,

    Lisa A. Freeman
    Associate Professor and Associate Head
    Department of English